Let’s End the Cycle of Blame in Syria

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This week a draft resolution was brought before the United Nations Security Council, condemning a recent chemical weapons attack in Syria that claimed the lives of more than 80 civilians, many of them children. The draft resolution was vetoed by Russia – the chief ally of the Syrian regime. Following the defeated resolution, there was a war of words exchanged between Council members and particularly harsh words directed towards the Russian Federation.

Against the backdrop of the past week, I’ve been wondering whether there might be another way to view recent events. What if the current crisis in Syria were actually an opportunity to shift the situation? A way to move beyond the deadlock that has persisted for six years…

Well, if this were an opportunity to move forward, I would argue that international leaders need to stop blaming each other. This is not to say that I don’t understand or appreciate the level of anger and frustration expressed by member states during the UN Security Council session. I also find it difficult to comprehend how Russia can continue its support for the Syrian regime.

At the same time, finger pointing and blaming will only isolate Russia further. Whether we like it or not, it’s difficult to think of a solution to this crisis without having Russia on board. When the Syrian regime used chemical weapons in the town of Ghouta in August 2013, Russia became part of the solution when it proposed to assist in the dismantling and verification of Syria’s chemical weapons.

When we get wrapped up in anger and blame about a certain country’s position or policy, we overlook an important fact. Each country that has a stake in this conflict is led by a person, a fellow human being. Individuals can shift their positions – witness China’s decision to abstain on this week’s UN Resolution rather than veto it. It is, however, unlikely that a person will be open to shifting or reconsidering their position if they feel undermined before a conversation even begins.

We can loath what is going on in Syria, but playing the blame game will only serve to perpetuate the cycle of violence and prolong international inaction. If our leaders were being truly honest they would acknowledge that we all bear a degree of responsibility for what has happened in Syria – and for what continues to happen each day. Why doesn’t six years of suffering at the hands of conventional weapons constitute a ‘red line’ for anyone? The fact is that it should.

So I would urge leaders to shift away from the language of blame because it serves no purpose in resolving this conflict. Instead of blaming each other, they should focus more on the people of Syria. I’m sure Syrians don’t give a damn whose fault this war is – they just want it to stop.

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